Monday, February 22, 2010

Our Book Deal: The Dyslexic Advantage

We wanted to share with our blog readers, our happy news of signing a book deal with Penguin (Hudson Street imprint) for The Dyslexic Advantage - to be published in 2011. It's really a dream come true for us, and we thank all of you who have helped us tell this story.

From our proposal:

"One of the most common misconceptions people have about dyslexia is that it's merely a learning disability—and nothing more. This isn't really surprising, since this is the message clearly conveyed by most definitions of dyslexia. Take, for example, the most widely used definition in the United States, from the National Institutes of Health and the International Dyslexia Association: "Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is…characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities…." The bottom line: dyslexia is a learning disability—period.

This understanding of dyslexia might seem sufficient if you examined dyslexic individuals (and especially children) only when they were trying to read, or spell, or perform some of the other tasks that they often find difficult; but something strange happens when you view these same individuals when they're doing almost anything else.

Viewed across a broader range of activities and over their entire lifespan, most dyslexic individuals not only cease to appear disabled, but they actually appear remarkably capable—even specially advantaged. This dyslexic advantage is clearly apparent in studies showing that dyslexic individuals are represented in at least twice their incidence in the population in such complex fields as engineering, astrophysics, art, computer graphics, and entrepreneurship. It's also apparent in the fact that dyslexic individuals often rank among the most eminent and creative persons in their professions. Findings like these do more than cast doubt on the simplistic equation "dyslexia equals disability"—they completely destroy it.

That's the exciting message of The Dyslexic Advantage: That dyslexia isn't just a learning disorder—that there's a remarkable, strength-producing aspect to dyslexic processing that's as central to what dyslexia is all about."

In The Dyslexic Advantage, we'll talk about the MIND advantages that come with the dyslexic processing style - in brief, Mechanical, Iconic, Narrative, and Dynamic systems thinking, and how they can translate into career success in such diverse fields as computer or other high tech, marketing, economics, art and architecture, fiction writing and film, and corporate leadership. We'll talk about visualization and visual thinking (some may know already from Tom West's fabulous book In the Mind's Eye), but also how personal memory and inductive thinking have a special role in many dyslexic thinking strengths.

There are many books written about dyslexia, and many with helpful strategies to help with reading or spelling, but all too few that look at challenges within the broader context of thinking differences of which they are a part.

If you'd like to join the discussion, please consider joining ourDyslexic Advantage Social Network. We've also opening up a new content site atwww.DyslexicAdvantage.com

4 comments:

  1. Congratulations! That's really wonderful. Your book sounds like it will really change the way people think, and that can only be a good thing. I will be sure to tell other people about it. You two are wonderful.

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  2. Congrats! Hope all goes well with the writing, editing process! Let me know as soon as it's done and send me a copy for review in Optometry & Vision Development!
    Dominick Maino, OD, MEd
    dmaino@ico.edu

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  3. Wow... congradulations! I found this doing a google search for "blog to book deals", for my own selfish reasons. That said, as someone w/ dyslexia / ADHD, and the parent of a child w/ developmental / cognative learning disabilities, I look forward to learning more about your work.

    Gives me hope that i can be listed as one of the dyslexic advantage(d) over on the side of your page, someday...

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  4. Anonymous4:54 PM

    I am referring your link to friends and we await the book with excitement. Thank you so much for your work.

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