Tuesday, January 11, 2005

Automatic Learning and the Cerebellum

There are many things we take for granted, but when something goes wrong we see how important they were all along. The mighty cerebellum is essential for many aspects of 'automatic' learning - playing the piano or typing fast, or returning a serve on the tennis court faster than you can think to 'swing'.

The "little voice in your head" under the cerebellum's command. Many of us need that "little voice" to keep information in mind when we're hearing too much at once...as we repeat it back to ourselves it gets embedded more deeply into our memory. Sometimes improving a child's speech articulation can also improve what she remembers because "the little voice" in her head becomes more automatic, and she can use as a back-up memory system.

Many children with individual wiring difficulties or symptoms of 'sensory processing' problems may have cerebellar problems that seem mild, but they may be still bad enough to make it difficult to balance on a bike, write by hand, or carry a tray across a crowded lunchroom. These children may try to compensate cognitively (it's not automatic), but they are often memory overloaded and they become exhausted over the course of the day.

Entrez PubMed



ON THE SPECIFIC ROLE OF THE CEREBELLUM IN MOTOR LEARNING AND

2 comments:

  1. Very interesting. It seems that part of what I am doing in learning to use different coping mechanisms and assimilating alternative personalities created during times of childhood trauma IS neurolearning. I'll be checking back with your blog to learn more. Please check mine, too! http://ellonwheels.blogspot.com/

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  2. Cool -thanks for your comments. We will check out your blog too. There are fascinating fMRI studies about post-traumatic stress disorders too -
    Like: http://www.robarts.ca/news/docs/news_january_12_04.pdf

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